Events

"Flow paths and strain in a subduction wedge, Cascadia subduction zone, NW Washington State"

Christopher Thissen

June 23, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Christopher Thissen

Christopher Thissen, postdoctoral fellow at DTM, will give a talk titled "Flow paths and strain in a subduction wedge, Cascadia subduction zone, NW Washington State" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 23 June 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Thissen received his Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from Yale University in 2016. His research interests include the link between fabric formation and seismic anisotropy, the development of preferred crystal orientations, natural deformation experiments, the tectonics and geodynamo of the Late Cretaceous, and the rheology of Earth materials over large spatial scales.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"The Search for Potential Habitable Worlds in Our Galaxy"

Ravi Kopparapu

June 16, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Ravi Kopparapu

Ravi Kopparapu, assistant research scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/University of Maryland, will give a talk titled "The Search for Potential Habitable Worlds in Our Galaxy" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 16 June 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Kopparapu received his Ph.D. in physics from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, in 2006. His research interests include extrasolar planets, habitability, atmospheric modeling and characterization, and planetary transit analysis. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Ethics Workshop"

Rick Carlson

June 15, 2016
Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series
Richard Carlson

Richard Carlson, director of DTM, will lead a discussion* titled "Ethics Workshop" at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, June 15, 2016, in the Abelson Collaboration Center as part of DTM's Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series.

Carlson received his PH.D. in Earth sciences from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1980. His current research focus includes the study of nucleosynthetic heterogeneity in the early Solar nebula, attempts to more precisely determine the age of Earth’s moon, and various projects aimed at understanding the origin and evolution of continental crust on Earth and the consequences of its formation for the chemical constitution and structure of Earth’s interior.

Coffee, tea, and lights snacks will be served before the workshop at 2:30 p.m.

*This workshop is open to Carnegie personnel only.

"25 Years Ago at Pinatubo: The Forecast, Climax, and Aftermath of a Giant Eruption"

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June 13, 2016
Carnegie Science Public Lecture
Chris Newhall & Renato Solidum

Twenty-five years ago, a small team of Philippine and US scientists worked feverishly to forecast what newly-awakened Mount Pinatubo might do, and to alert everyone from indigenous peoples to high tech military about what to expect and the possible need to evacuate.   Skepticism was high and had to be overcome with a combination of video, hard facts and numbers, and personal trust.   Uncertainties were also high, which required erring on the side of safety and being willing to be wrong. Chris Newhall will highlight the pre-eruption preparation and introduce the eruption, and Renato Solidum will trace events from the eruption through long-lasting lahars.

The Carnegie Institution will open its doors at 6:00 p.m. The lecture will start at 6:45 p.m. An overflow room, with screens, will be available when the auditorium reaches maximum capacity. Seating in the auditorium is on a first-come, first-served basis.

The lecture is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.

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Program Partners: Carnegie Institution for Science, The Embassy of the Philippines in Washington D.C., The United States Geological Survey, and The Smithsonian Institution

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