Events

"Presolar Stardust in the Solar System"

Larry Nittler

April 28, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Larry Nittler

Larry Nittler, staff scientist at DTM, will give a talk titled "Presolar Stardust in the Solar System" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 28 March 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Nittler received his Ph.D. in physics from Washington University in 1996. He studies the origin and evolution of stars, the Galaxy, and the Solar System, both through laboratory analysis of extraterrestrial materials like meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and through planetary remote sensing via spacecraft.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"High-Pressure Alchemy"

Alexander Goncharov

April 28, 2016
Neighborhood Lecture Series
Alexander Goncharov

Alexander Goncharov, senior staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory, will give a talk titled "High-Pressure Alchemy" at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 28, 2016 as part of Carnegie's Neighborhood Lecture Series. 

A major focus of the field of chemistry is predicting how various atoms form bonds, hence molecules, and how such bonding controls the structure and properties of molecular matter. Historically, almost all chemistry has been performed at ambient pressure - the atmospheric pressure at the Earth’s surface. However, the majority of matter in the universe resides at extreme pressures and temperatures that force atoms into extremely close contact, where chemical behavior can become surprising, and where very exotic compounds can become stable.

During this lecture, Goncharov will explain how we do experiments at extreme pressures, in some cases exceeding one million atmospheres. He will present some recent discoveries of unusual “salts,” and stable compounds with noble gases. These exotic materials hold a promise of potentially unparalleled physical and chemical properties. Many of these newly discovered extreme materials are made of the most abundant elements in the universe and thus are likely to be present in the interiors of giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. 

Lectures are free, but registration is encouraged. Click here to RSVP.

"The initial abundance of 60Fe and the implications for solar system history"

Myriam Telus

April 21, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Myriam Telus

Myriam Telus, a postdoctoral fellow at DTM, will give a talked titled, "The initial abundance of 60Fe and the implications for solar system history", at 11.m. on Thursday, 21 April 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Telus received her Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa in 2015. research in cosmochemistry involves constraining early solar system history through isotopic analyses of meteorites and their components. She is especially interested in constraining the source, abundance, and distribution of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system to constrain early solar system chronology and understand the conditions surrounding the solar system’s formation. She is also interested in understanding the role of volatiles during thermal metamorphism and differentiation of planetary bodies.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

Informal Discussion with Tuve Fellow Jacqueline Dixon

Jackie Dixon

April 20, 2016
Postdoctoral Development Workshop
Jacqueline E. Dixon

Jacqueline E. Dixon, professor of geological oceanography at the University of South Florida and DTM Merle A. Tuve Fellow, will hold an informal discussion* with postdoctoral fellows at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, April 20, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall.

Dixon received her Ph.D. in geochemistry from California Institute of Technology in 1992. Her research interests focus on the role of H2O and CO2 in the generation and evolution of basaltic magmas with an emphasis on submarine volcanoes.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

*This event is closed to Carnegie personnel only. 

 

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