Events

"Sulfur isotopic variability in meteoritic materials"

James Farquhar

February 18, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
James Farquhar

James Farquhar, a professor at the Earth Systems Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Geology at the University of Maryland, will give a talk titled, "Sulfur isotopic variability in meteoritic materials", at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 18 February 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Farquhar received his Ph.D. in Earth and atmospheric sciences from the University of Alberta in 1995. He is interested in table isotope geochemistry, including atmosphere-surface interactions, atmospheric evolution, sulfur and oxygen biogeochemistry, meteorite studies, isotopic exchange and thermometry.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

“Images and spectra of extrasolar planets”

Bruce Macintosh

February 11, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Bruce Macintosh

Bruce Macintosh, a physics professor at Stanford University, will give a talk titled, “Images and spectra of extrasolar planets,” at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 11 February 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Macintosh received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the UCLA in 1994. His specialities include adaptive optics, high-contrast imaging, and direct detection of extrasolar planets.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m. 

"The First Billion Years on Mars: Insights from Crustal and Sedimentary Records"

Kevin Lewis

February 4, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Kevin Lewis

Kevin Lewis, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, will give a talk titled, "The First Billion Years on Mars: Insights from Crustal and Sedimentary Records",  at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 4 Febraury 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Lewis received his Ph.D. in planetary science from Caltech in 2009. His research focuses on problems in planetary geophysics, from the scale of a grain of sand all the way up to the crust of a planet. He has worked in depth on the nature of sedimentary rocks of Mars, and what they might record about that planet's past climate and habitability. He is also interested in understanding the large-scale properties of planetary lithospheres using magnetic, gravity, and topography data sets.  

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"How to Give a Great Talk"

Alycia Weinberger

February 2, 2016
Postdoctoral Development Workshop
Alycia Weinberger

Alycia Weinberger, a staff scientist at DTM, will lead a postdoctoral development workshop* titled, "How to Give a Great Talk", at 3 p.m. on 2 February 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall.

At this workshop, postdocs will learn best practices and techniques for giving a successful talk. Departments differ greatly in how they organize hiring. Some departments have group interviews, some use their seminar list as a giant rolling admissions, and some start with a phone interview. These differences underscore the central piece of advice: every talk is a job talk. There is no such thing as an informal talk, even though some faculty in a department may ask you for one. Learning how to give a great talk will be important for your future job prospects.

Coffee, tea, and some light snacks will be served before the lecture at 2:30 p.m.

*This workshop is restricted to Carnegie personnel only.

Pages