Events

"25 Years Ago at Pinatubo: The Forecast, Climax, and Aftermath of a Giant Eruption"

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June 13, 2016
Carnegie Science Public Lecture
Chris Newhall & Renato Solidum

Twenty-five years ago, a small team of Philippine and US scientists worked feverishly to forecast what newly-awakened Mount Pinatubo might do, and to alert everyone from indigenous peoples to high tech military about what to expect and the possible need to evacuate.   Skepticism was high and had to be overcome with a combination of video, hard facts and numbers, and personal trust.   Uncertainties were also high, which required erring on the side of safety and being willing to be wrong. Chris Newhall will highlight the pre-eruption preparation and introduce the eruption, and Renato Solidum will trace events from the eruption through long-lasting lahars.

The Carnegie Institution will open its doors at 6:00 p.m. The lecture will start at 6:45 p.m. An overflow room, with screens, will be available when the auditorium reaches maximum capacity. Seating in the auditorium is on a first-come, first-served basis.

The lecture is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.

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Program Partners: Carnegie Institution for Science, The Embassy of the Philippines in Washington D.C., The United States Geological Survey, and The Smithsonian Institution

"Young Stars and Disks"

Jessica Donaldson

June 2, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Jessica Donaldson

Jessica Donaldson, a postdoctoral associate at DTM, will give a talk titled "Young Stars and Disks" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 2, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Donaldson received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2014. Donaldson's research focuses on understanding the last stages of planet formation by observing circumstellar environments. Specifically, she tries to determine the composition of dust grains in young debris disks which may be the sites of ongoing planet formation. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"EARTHQUAKES; Forecasting and Prediction: Why Have we Failed?"

I. Selwyn Sacks

May 26, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Selwyn Sacks

Selwyn Sacks, staff scientist emeritus at DTM, will give a talk titled "EARTHQUAKES; Forecasting and Prediction: Why Have we Failed?" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 26 May 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Sacks received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Witwatersrand in 1961. His research interests include geophysics, seismology, tectonophysics, and core structure.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Beyond Pluto: The Hunt for Planet X"

Scott S. Sheppard

May 19, 2016
Neighborhood Lecture Series
Scott Sheppard

Scott Sheppard, staff scientist at DTM, will give a talk titled "Beyond Pluto: The Hunt for Planet X" at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 19, 2016 in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of Carnegie's Neighborhood Lecture Series. 

The Kuiper Belt, which has Pluto as the largest member, is a region of comet-like objects just beyond Neptune. This belt of objects has an outer edge, which we are only now able to explore in detail. For the past few years we have been performing the largest and deepest survey ever attempted to search for distant solar system objects. The ongoing search has discovered the object with the most distant orbit known in our solar system and several of the largest known objects after the major planets.

These extremely distant objects are strangely grouped closely together in space, which suggests a yet unobserved planet more massive than the Earth is shepherding them into these similar orbits. Dr. Sheppard will discuss the most recent discoveries at the fringe of our solar system.

Lectures are free, but registration is encouraged. Click here to RSVP.

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