Events

"Diet Affects Behavior: How Ingested Fluids and Sediments Influence Alaska Subduction Zone Earthquakes"

Donna Shillington

June 1, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Donna Shillington

Donna Shillington, associate research professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, will present a lecture titled "Diet Affects Behavior: How Ingested Fluids and Sediments Influence Alaska Subduction Zone Earthquakes" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Greenewalt lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Shillington received her Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Georgia in 2004. She uses active-source seismology together with other geophysical and geological data to investigate deformation, magmatism and sedimentary processes at plate boundaries, including continental rifts and rifted margins, subduction zones, and transform boundaries.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Observing the Evolution of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks"

Sean Andrews

May 25, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Sean Andrews

Sean Andrews, an astrophysicist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, will give a talk titled "Observing the Evolution of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, May 25, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Andrews received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Hawaii in 2007. His research interests include structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks; planet formation, planet-disk interactions, and debris disks; aperture synthesis observations, and techniques at mm/radio frequencies; continuum, and molecular line radiative transfer modeling; fundamental physical parameters of young stars.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Mars, Moons, Missions & Microbes: Life as We Don't Know It - How Do We Find It?"

Andrew Steele

May 25, 2017
Neighborhood lecture Series
Andrew Steele

Our Broad Branch Road Spring 2017 Neighborhood Lecture Series continues with Andrew Steele, a staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory.  Steele will present, "Mars, Moons, Missions & Microbes: Life as We Don't Know It - How Do We Find It?" at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 25, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall. 

The main focus of Steele’s research has been the development of scientific and measurement criteria for the unambiguous detection of life in early Earth and Mars samples, and future robotic and sample return missions to Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Steele’s talk will explain how this research has evolved into a three-pronged approach to laboratory investigations using a diverse range of techniques and samples coupled with development and testing of instrumentation for future Mars missions and the characterization of data from space flight missions to Earth orbit, Mars, and comets.

Doors open at 6 p.m. Lecture Hall seating is first to come, first serve. Eventbrite tickets are not required, so please arrive early to reserve your seat. Eventbrite registration is encouraged to skip the sign-in process at the door.

Light refreshments will be served before the lecture at 6 p.m.

"Pre & On-Campus Interviews"

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May 17, 2017
Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series
Anat Shahar, Steve Shirey

Anat Shahar, a staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory, and Steve Shirey, a staff scientist at DTM, will lead a workshop* titled "Pre & On-Campus Interviews" at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, in the Abelson Collaboration Center as part of DTM's Postdoctoral Development Workshop series.

Shahar received her Ph.D. in geochemistry from the University of California Los Angeles in 2008. The goal of her research is to understand the mechanisms responsible for stable isotope fractionation. She is particularly interested in how pressure and temperature affect the isotopic ratios of materials during planetary formation, differentiation, and evolution.

Shirey received his Ph.D. in geochemistry from the State University of New York, Stony Brook, in 1984. He is interested in how Earth's continents formed. The study of continents from the deepest samples also led to his recent interest in diamonds.

Coffee, tea, and snacks will be served before the workshop at 10:30 a.m.

*This workshop is open to Carnegie personnel only.

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