Events

"Applying and Interviewing for Permanent Academic Positions"

NASA

September 28, 2016
Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series
Aki Roberge, Jan Rigby

Aki Roberge and Jane Rigby, both research astrophysicists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, will host a workshop titled "Applying and Interviewing for Permanent Academic Positions" at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 in the Abelson Collaboration Center as part of DTM's Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series.

Roberge received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from Johns Hopkins University in 2002. She's interested in the study of planet formation through multi-band observations of young circumstellar disks, as well as planning and development for future exoplanet observations. Roberge was also a postdoctoral fellow at DTM from 2002-2005.

Rigby received her Ph.D. in astronomy from The University of Arizona in 2006. She also serves as the deputy project scientist for operations for the James Webb Space Telescope. Her research interests include galaxy evolution, star–forming galaxies, and active galactic nuclei; the star–formation, metal–enrichment, and black hole growth histories of the universe; gravitational lenses as natural telescopes; diagnostic astrophysical spectroscopy; and science systems engineering for upcoming space telescopes.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the workshop at 10:30 a.m.

This workshop is open to Carnegie personnel only.

"Exoplanets and Debris Disks: Finding the Needle by Modeling the Haystack"

Erika Nesvold

September 22, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Erika Nesvold

Erika Nesvold, postdoctoral fellow at DTM, will give a talk titled "Exoplanets and Debris Disks: Finding the Needle by Modeling the Haystack" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, September 22, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Nesvold received her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, in 2015. She is interested in the interaction between a debris disk and any planets orbiting in or near the disk. She models this interaction to determine how asymmetries and features observed in a disk can indicate the presence of an unseen exoplanet and even constrain its mass and orbit.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"How To Give A Good Talk: Finding and Keeping a Job"

Matthew Scott

September 21, 2016
Postdoc Appreciation Week Event
Matthew Scott

Matthew Scott, president of the Carnegie Institution for Science, will give a talk titled "How to Give a Good Talk: Finding and Keeping a Job" at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, for our postdoctoral fellows and associates as part of Carnegie's Postdoc Appreciation Week events.

The National Postdoctoral Association holds National Postdoc Appreciation Week each year to recognize the significant contributions that postdoctoral scholars make to U.S. research and discovery.  This year, the celebratory week will be held September 19-23, 2016.

Scott received his Ph.D. in biology from the Massachusettes Institute of Technology in 1980. He moved to Indiana University for his postdoctoral work as a Helen Hay Whitney fellow with Profs. Thomas Kaufman and Barry Polisky. After setting up his own lab at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Dr. Scott came to Stanford in 1990 to join the newly formed Department of Developmental Biology, and the Department of Genetics. His research focused on genes that control development, and how damage to these genes leads to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. He discovered the “homeobox,” an evolutionarily conserved component of many genes that control development. His lab group discovered the genetic basis of the most common human cancer, basal cell carcinoma, and of the most common childhood malignant brain tumor, medulloblastoma. He served as Associate Chair and Chair of the Department of Developmental Biology for a total of six years. He chaired the multidisciplinary Bio-X program at Stanford from 2001-2007. He is presently Co-chair of the Center for Children’s Brain Tumors. He has been recognized by election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine, and served as President of the Society for Developmental Biology. His awards include the Passano Award (1990), the Conklin Medal of the Society for Developmental Biology (2004), and the Pasarow Award in Cancer Research (2013).

This talk is open to Carnegie Science postdocs only.

"Kepler's discovery of worlds with multiple suns"

Nader Haghighipour

September 15, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Nader Haghighipour

Nader Haghighipour, an astronomer at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii, will give a talk titled "Kepler's discovery of worlds with multiple suns" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, September 15, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Haghighipour received his Ph.D. in physics and planetary dynamics from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1999. His research interests include Solar System dynamics and formation theory, as well as extrasolar planets theory and observation. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

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