Events

"Mars, Moons, Missions & Microbes: Life as We Don't Know It - How Do We Find It?"

Andrew Steele

May 25, 2017
Neighborhood lecture Series
Andrew Steele

Our Broad Branch Road Spring 2017 Neighborhood Lecture Series continues with Andrew Steele, a staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory.  Steele will present, "Mars, Moons, Missions & Microbes: Life as We Don't Know It - How Do We Find It?" at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 25, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall. 

The main focus of Steele’s research has been the development of scientific and measurement criteria for the unambiguous detection of life in early Earth and Mars samples, and future robotic and sample return missions to Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Steele’s talk will explain how this research has evolved into a three-pronged approach to laboratory investigations using a diverse range of techniques and samples coupled with development and testing of instrumentation for future Mars missions and the characterization of data from space flight missions to Earth orbit, Mars, and comets.

Doors open at 6 p.m. Lecture Hall seating is first to come, first serve. Eventbrite tickets are not required, so please arrive early to reserve your seat. Eventbrite registration is encouraged to skip the sign-in process at the door.

Light refreshments will be served before the lecture at 6 p.m.

"Pre & On-Campus Interviews"

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May 17, 2017
Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series
Anat Shahar, Steve Shirey

Anat Shahar, a staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory, and Steve Shirey, a staff scientist at DTM, will lead a workshop* titled "Pre & On-Campus Interviews" at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, in the Abelson Collaboration Center as part of DTM's Postdoctoral Development Workshop series.

Shahar received her Ph.D. in geochemistry from the University of California Los Angeles in 2008. The goal of her research is to understand the mechanisms responsible for stable isotope fractionation. She is particularly interested in how pressure and temperature affect the isotopic ratios of materials during planetary formation, differentiation, and evolution.

Shirey received his Ph.D. in geochemistry from the State University of New York, Stony Brook, in 1984. He is interested in how Earth's continents formed. The study of continents from the deepest samples also led to his recent interest in diamonds.

Coffee, tea, and snacks will be served before the workshop at 10:30 a.m.

*This workshop is open to Carnegie personnel only.

"Mantle Plumes Rooted at the Core-mantle Boundary: Evidence from Seismic Waveform Tomography"

Barbara Romanowicz

May 16, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Barbara Romanowicz

Barbara Romanowicz, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, will give a talk titled "Mantle Plumes Rooted at the Core-mantle Boundary: Evidence from Seismic Waveform Tomography" at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, May 16, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Romanowicz received her Ph.D. in geophysics from the Paris Diderot University in 1979. She is interested in deep Earth structure and dynamics using seismological tools, earthquake processes and scaling laws, real-time estimation of earthquake parameters, development of modern broadband seismic and geophysical observations on land and in the oceans, and planetary seismology.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Global Warming: Geochemical and Geophysical Implications of a Higher Mantle Temperature"

Erik Hauri

May 11, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Erik Hauri

Erik Hauri, a staff scientist at DTM, will give a talk titled "Global Warming: Geochemical and Geophysical Implications of a Higher Mantle Temperature" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, May 11, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Hauri received his Ph.D. in geochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 1992. The goal of his research is to understand how planetary processes affect the chemistry of the Earth, Moon and other objects, and to use that chemistry to understand the origin and evolution of planetary bodies.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

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