Events

"Anatomy of a Megathrust Plate Boundary Through the Earthquake Cycle"

Susan Schwartz

April 13, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Susan Schwartz

Susan Schwartz, a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, will present a lecture titled "Anatomy of a Megathrust Plate Boundary Through the Earthquake Cycle" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, April 13, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Schwartz received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Her research addresses problems in earthquake seismology, Earth structure, active tectonics, and volcano seismology and geodesy. Her research interests include the mechanical behavior of the seismogenic zone at subduction margins, interrogation of the velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle lithosphere at or near plate boundaries, volcanic deformation and seismicity, and seismotectonics of the San Andreas fault system and Costa Rica.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

“Effects of Subduction Obliquity on Mantle Wedge Flow Patterns and Subduction Zone Processes”

Ikuko Wada

March 30, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Ikuko Wada

Ikuko Wada, an assistant professor in geodynamics at the University of Minnesota, will give a talk titled “Effects of Subduction Obliquity on Mantle Wedge Flow Patterns and Subduction Zone Processes” at 11 a.m. on Thursday, March 30, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Wada received her Ph.D. in Earth and ocean sciences from the University of Victoria in 2009. Her research interests are focused primarily on subduction zone geodynamics. One of her goals is to provide a better understanding of physical conditions that control geophysical and geochemical processes in subduction zones, such as megathrust earthquakes, intraslab earthquakes, mantle wedge flow, transport of volatiles, generation of melts, and arc volcanism. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Jumping Genes: What They Mean for Evolution and Medicine"

Matthew Scott

March 16, 2017
Neighborhood Lecture Series
Matthew Scott

Our Broad Branch Road Spring 2017 Neighborhood Lecture Series kicks off with Carnegie Science President, Dr. Matthew P. Scott. Scott will present, "Jumping Genes: What They Mean for Evolution and Medicine" at 6:30 p.m on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall.

The DNA of one human cell—two copies of our “genome”—would stretch almost two meters if fully extended. However, normally it’s tightly packaged in 46 chromosomes. About 20,000 genes are distributed along this DNA; they carry the information for building and operating a human. Any particular gene is located at a specific place in a chromosome and, normally, stays there. Carnegie scientist Barbara McClintock discovered, in corn, that some genes jump from one place in a chromosome to another. Similar things occur in most organisms, including us. This discovery, which earned a Nobel prize, led to dramatic advances in understanding infectious disease, evolution, and the controls that turn genes on and off in specific places and tissues. This talk will discuss early life on Earth, how jumping genes may have influenced it, and why we should care about jumping genes now…for example if you use antibiotics.

Doors open at 6 p.m. Lecture Hall seating is first come, first serve. Eventbrite tickets are not required, so please arrive early to reserve your seat. Eventbrite registration is encouraged to skip the sign-in process at the door.

Light refreshments will be available before the lecture at 6 p.m.

"Finding Terrestrial Exoplanets with Precise Radial Velocities"

Sharon Wang

March 16, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Sharon Xuesong Wang

Sharon Xuesong Wang, a postdoctoral fellow at DTM, will give a talk titled "Finding Terrestrial Exoplanets with Precise Radial Velocities" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, March 16, 2017, in the Greenewalt Auditorium as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Wang received her Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from The Pennsylvania State University, State College, in 2016. Her primary research interest is in detecting rocky exoplanet using radial velocities (RVs). Such detections require high RV precision, especially for rocky planets in the Habitable Zone of Sun-like stars (< 1 m/s). Wang works on pushing the RV limit beyond the current 1-2 m/s level, which is set by limitations in instrumentation, data analysis, and the understanding of astrophysical noise.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

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