News

More than 300 Attend Virtual Presentation of "Earth's First Crust"

Screen Shot from Earths First Crust NLS Event

On September 24, 2020, Richard Carlson, Director of the Earth & Planets Laboratory (EPL), presented Earth's First Crust to a virtual crowd of more than 300 participants.

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Life on Venus? Six Carnegie Scientists Respond

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The September 2020 announcement that scientists found phosphine gas on Venus set off a buzz of excitement across the scientific world, leaving one question in the minds of many spectators: Did we just discover signs of life on Venus? Six Carnegie scientists respond. 

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Join Us for the Fall 2020 Virtual Neighborhood Lecture Series

 Artist conception of the Moon forming from a synestia, a hypothesized rapidly spinning donut-shaped mass of vaporized rock. Carnegie field crew on 3.5 billion year old rocks at Point Lake, NWT, Canada. Scientists search for what’s left of Earth’s oldest

After postponing our lectures this spring, we're thrilled to announce that the Neighborhood Lecture Series is back—virtually of course. The silver lining? Now that the lectures are being held online, the whole world is our neighborhood!
 

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Postdoc Spotlight: Zack Torrano Solves Cosmic Mysteries Using Solar System’s Oldest Solids

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In this postdoc spotlight, Zack Torrano explains how his recent research showed that the oldest solids in our Solar System preserved Ti isotopic variability inherited from the materials from which our Solar System formed. He also discusses how his early love of nature inspired him to want to explore and understand our world and its place in the Universe.

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Peculiar planetary system architecture around three Orion stars explained

New observations of GW Orionis, a triple star system with a peculiar inner region, revealed that this object has a warped planet-forming disk with a misaligned ring.

The discovery that our galaxy is teeming with exoplanets has also revealed the vast diversity of planetary systems out there and raised questions about the processes that shaped them. New work published in Science by an international team including Carnegie’s Jaehan Bae could explain the architecture of multi-star systems in which planets are separated by wide gaps and do not orbit on the same plane as their host star’s equatorial center.

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Probing the origin of the mantle’s chemically distinct “scars”

Basalt - Basalt, the most-common rock on Earth’s surface, encases green crystals--a geologic "nesting doll" phenomenon called a xenolith. Basalts such as this one derive from a section of the mantle that has been depleted in incompatible trace elements, w

 The composition of Earth’s mantle was shaped by interactions with the oceanic crust more than previously thought, according to work from Carnegie’s Jonathan Tucker and Peter van Keken along with colleagues from Oxford that was recently published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.

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