Dates, Speakers Announced for Fall 2019 Neighborhood Lecture Series

Left: Artist's rendition of Kepler Telescope courtesy of NASA. Center: Color-coded image of nuclear magnetic resonance echo courtesy of George Cody. Right: Photo of coral reef with bleached corals courtesy of Yixian Zheng. 
Tuesday, July 23, 2019 


The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) and Geophysical Laboratory (GL) host Neighborhood Lecture events at the Carnegie Institution for Science's beautiful Broad Branch Road (BBR) campus in Northwest Washington, DC. BBR Neighborhood Lectures provide an opportunity to get up close and personal with DTM and GL scientists. These lectures begin at 6:30 p.m. and last for approximately one hour, followed by a brief question and answer period.

 

UNIVERSAL LIFE: THE SEARCH FOR LIFE BEYOND THE SOLAR SYSTEM | Thursday, September 12, 2019, 6:30 PM – 7:45 PM EDT

We stand at an epochal moment in human history—we are about to learn if we are alone in the universe. The Kepler Space Telescope has shown that Earth-like worlds are commonplace. NASA is planning to spend billions of dollars on future space telescopes that will seek definitive proof of the existence and habitability, if not evidence of actual inhabitation, of rocky, Earth-like worlds around the nearest stars. Three large consortia are trying to beat NASA to this goal by planning and building the next generation of extremely large ground-based telescopes, including the Carnegie Institution’s Giant Magellan Telescope, now under construction in Chile. This talk will summarize the amazing discoveries that led us to this point, and discuss the competing visions for discovering life beyond our planetary system.

Presented by Dr. Alan Boss: Staff Scientist, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science

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THE MAGIC AND MYSTERY OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE | Thursday, October 3, 2019, 6:30 PM – 7:45 PM EDT

The phenomenon of magnetic resonance was first revealed in the classic Stern-Gerlach experiment in 1922. Over the nearly 100 years and 10 Nobel Prizes that followed, magnetic resonance has developed into one of the most-powerful analytical tools available to chemists, geochemists, physicists, molecular biologists, and materials scientists. The phenomenon of magnetic resonance also developed into one of the most-useful medical diagnostic methods via Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this talk George Cody will introduce and explain how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) works without going deep into the physics. Cody will also explain how MRI works, why it is counterintuitive, and why it takes so long and is so noisy! Finally, he will provide examples of how he uses NMR to address important problems in geochemistry.

Presented by Dr. George Cody: Staff Scientist, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution for Science

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THE BIOLOGY OF CORALS: BASIC RESEARCH AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH | Thursday, November 7, 2019, 6:30 PM – 7:45 PM EST

Symbiosis refers to mutually beneficial interactions between different organisms. Endosymbiosis is a type of symbiosis in which one organism lives inside another organism. Endosymbiotic relationships evolve in a wide range of forms, from terrestrial plants to aquatic mollusks and corals. In recent decades, the breakdown of endosymbiosis between corals and their symbiotic algae, i.e. coral bleaching due to climate change, has led to massive coral death and consequently coral reef degradation. By developing and applying different tools, we have uncovered genes that define the symbiotic states of coral, which reveal insights into why coral recovery from bleaching is slow and difficult, and how we may be able to enhance this process.

Presented by Dr. Yixian Zheng: Director, Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science

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