DTM Presents Geochemistry and Geophysics Posters at AGU 2017

Wednesday, December 13, 2017 


DTM scientists continued their participation at the 2017 AGU Fall meeting in New Orleans on Wednesday, December 13 with poster presentations on topics such as carbon in the upper mantle, continental crust formation, and evolution of the lower mantle and core.

Kei Shimizu presented a poster titled, "Interaction of ultra-depleted MORBs with plagioclase: implications for CO2/Ba ratios," as part of the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology program. Shimizu focuses on understanding the amount of carbon in the Earth's interior. This research looked at CO2/Barium ratios in magmas, as these ratios can be affected by a Barium-rich mineral in the oceanic crust called plagioclase. As low-barium magma passes through the oceanic crust, it could be mixing with some of the plagioclase, which could affect Barium concentrations. Carbon in the upper mantle can influence Earth's volcanism and seismology.

Kei Shimizu at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting.

Also part of the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology program, Jesse Reimink and Director Rick Carlson presented a poster titled, "On the origin of cratonic 'high-mu' isotopic signatures." This research used neodymium analytical techniques on granites from the Slave and Wyoming cratons—some of the oldest continental crustal sections—to explore the question of how and when Earth's unique continental crust formed. Compared to other planets in the Solar System, continents are a unique feature that plays a key role in making the Earth's habitability.

Jesse Reimink at 2017 AGU Fall Meeting.

For the Study of Earth's Deep Interior program, Peter Driscoll presented a poster titled, "Sensitivity of geomagnetic reversal rate on core evolution from numerical dynamos." Driscoll's work is on the evolution of the Earth's core. He uses numerical models of the evolution of the magnetic field and compares his results to paleomagnetic observations. This research used numerical models and records of the seafloor magnetic states to infer the energetic evolution of the lower mantle and core.

Peter Driscoll at 2017 AGU Fall Meeting.

Roberto Molar Candanosa