Jessica Arnold Joins DTM's Astronomy Group as a Postdoctoral Associate

Jessica Arnold
An artist’s impression of a white dwarf (burned-out) star accreting rocky debris left behind by the star’s surviving planetary system. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)

Jessica Arnold joins DTM's astronomy group as a postdoctoral associate from the University of Oxford's Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics in Oxford, England, where her research aimed to understand how the thermal environments characteristic of airless solar system objects impact estimates of surface composition gathered via remote thermal infrared spectroscopy.  

Arnold received her Ph.D. in geoscience from Stony Brook University. Her dissertation work focused on bringing together computational modeling and laboratory measurements to improve the utility of thermal infrared remote sensing data. That project had three aspects: (1) compositional investigations of the lunar surface using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, (2) modeling the effects of particle size on thermal infrared spectra, and (3) measuring indices of refraction of geologically relevant minerals for use in spectroscopic models.

At DTM, Arnold will be working on light scattering of debris disks with Alycia Weinberger. She will use codes to calculate more accurate scattering parameters, including absorption efficiencies and phase functions, which will help resolve questions about the composition and physical properties of the components of both our own solar system and others. Her aim will be to use DDSCAT and other scattering codes to provide better characterization of the materials in both developing planetary systems and regoliths of airless solar system objects.

Please join us in welcoming Jessica Arnold to our campus.

June 16, 2017

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