planetary science

EPL Astronomer Scott Sheppard Talks to The Guardian About the Hunt for Planet X

EPL Astronomer Scott Sheppard Talks to The Guardian About the Hunt for Planet X

In a recent article published in The Guardian and written by astronomer and journalist Stuart Clark, Sheppard discusses the mounting evidence for the planet and how the Vera Rubin Observatory will revolutionize the search. In the article, Sheppard explains, “I think it’s more likely than unlikely to exist.” 
 

Read more...

5 Ways We Study the Birth of Planets (Including our Own!)

Five Ways We Study Baby Planets

Some say there is nothing that beats the joy of watching a child grow up. But what about watching a planet grow up? 

 
Read more...

The Snowy Start to Enceladus’ Tiger Stripes Explained

This image of the Tiger Stripes  is a composite of the images taken from the CASSINI mission.

Since the Cassini spacecraft first brought the stripes to the world’s attention in 2005, planetary scientists have posited several explanations for their formation. Hemingway’s model is the first of these to simultaneously answer the following five key questions: (1) How do the fissures form? (2) Why do they form in a parallel set? (3) Why are they each around 35 kilometers apart? (4) Why do they appear on the south pole? And, (5) Why are they found only on Enceladus?

To answer these questions and understand why he chose to study the Tiger Stripes, we spoke with Hemingway.

Read more...

How Enceladus Got Its Stripes

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, JPL, SSI, Cassini Imaging Team

Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus is of great interest to scientists due to its subsurface ocean, making it a prime target for those searching for life elsewhere. New research led by Carnegie’s Doug Hemingway reveals the physics governing the fissures through which oceanwater erupts from the moon’s icy surface, giving its south pole an unusual “tiger stripe” appearance.

Read more...

For #Apollo50th, 3 Things We Didn’t Know Before Landing on the Moon

For #Apollo50th, 3 Things We Didn’t Know Before Landing on the Moon

In honor of Apollo 11’s 50th anniversary, Carnegie DTM Director Rick Carlson summarized some of the science made possible by lunar samples brought back to Earth.

Read more...

When It Comes To Planetary Habitability, It’s What’s Inside That Counts

When It Comes To Planetary Habitability, It’s What’s Inside That Counts

Which of Earth’s features were essential for the origin and sustenance of life? And how do scientists identify those features on other worlds?

Read more...

Pages