The Geodynamo: Large Crowd Attends Peter Driscoll's Neighborhood Lecture

Peter Driscoll presented his Neighborhood Lecture, "The Geodynamo: A Unique Window into the Dynamics of Earth's Deep Interior," to a full house on November 8, 2018. Photo: Roberto Molar Candanosa, DTM.
Wednesday, November 14, 2018 


Neighbors and friends of Carnegie's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism filled the Greenewalt Auditorium at Carnegie's Broad Branch Road campus in Washington D.C., on November 8, 2018 for the second and last Fall 2018 Neighborhood Lecture, "The Geodynamo: A Unique Window into the Dynamics of Earth's Deep Interior," presented by DTM's Peter Driscoll.


During the lecture, Driscoll gave a brief overview of DTM's early involvement in geomagnetic surveys. He also discussed the importance of the geomagnetic field for Earth's interior and surface dynamics, and showed how his numerical simulations of magnetism in ancient rocks shed light on critical questions focusing on Earth's evolution and uniqueness in the Solar System.

A planetary magnetist who joined DTM in early 2015, Driscoll uses large-scale numerical simulations to investigate the coupling of the mantle and core and explore how this coupling manifests in paleomagnetic and tectonic observations. He investigates how the evolution of the geodynamo over the last 500 million years is related to convective cycles in the mantle, the growth of the solid inner core, and changes in rotation.

Driscoll's lecture on social media: