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Postdoc Spotlight: Exploring Exoplanets with Fabo Feng

Fabo Feng Title Card

In this video postdoc spotlight, Feng answers questions about his recent paper. He also explains how he finds exoplanets, discusses why he thinks exoplanet research is important and gives advice to young scientists. 

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When Earthquakes Strike, Some Seismologists Turn to USGS Data

Seismic display at Carnegie Science Broad Branch campus the day of the earthquake

When Diana Roman, a Carnegie Science staff scientist and seismologist, looked at the initial USGS report, she was relieved. Roman explained, “Almost immediately, we were able to see that it was a type of event [strike-slip] that we don’t associate with tsunamis. So that was the first good sign.”

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Exoplanet Conference Comes to Campus for Second Time

Broad Branch Campus Map with CHEXO sticky note attached,

Carnegie Earth and Planets Laboratory (formerly the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and the Geophysical Laboratory) hosted the seventh Chesapeake Bay Area Exoplanet (CHEXO) meeting on Friday, January 24, 2020. It was the second time that the meeting, which happens approximately three times per year, has been held on the Carnegie Science Broad Branch Road campus.

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Year-Long Exploration Aims to Add Gravity to the Volcano Monitoring Toolkit

Hélène Le Mével - Preparing for Villarrica-19 copy.jpg

Hélène Le Mével prepares for a year-long study in Chile to study Villarrica volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in the world. The study will include one of the most-extensive monitoring plans to date for the volcano, which is a popular tourist destination. It will also present an opportunity to pioneer the use of gravity as a monitoring tool.

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Carnegie Science Earth and Planets Director Richard Carlson receives Geochemical Society's highest honor

Carnegie Science Earth and Planets Director Richard Carlson receives Geochemical Society's highest honor

 Richard Carlson, director of Carnegie’s Earth and Planets division, has been chosen to receive the Geochemical Society’s highest honor, the Victor Moritz Goldschmidt Award, in recognition of his forefront research into the formation of the Solar System and the geologic history of the Earth, the society announced Tuesday.

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