https://dtm.carnegiescience.edu/news/how-earth-and-planets-lab-exploring-universe-social-distance

About Us

At the Earth and Planets Laboratory, we work at the frontier of human knowledge. We discover new worlds, create new materials, illuminate the inner workings of our planet, and seek to understand the universe that is our home. In 2020 we merged the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (est.1904) and the Geophysical Lab (est.1905) to create a new multidisciplinary department. By combining a century of scientific trailblazing, we are better suited than ever to collaborate, discover, and innovate.

Upcoming Events

Latest articles and news

Postdoc Spotlight: Li Zhu Codes the Roadmap to New Materials

Li Zhu shows off the newly discovered carbon clathrate molecule

Thomas Edison invented the first successful lightbulb after thousands of failed trials. His discovery of that perfect incandescent carbon filament literally lit up the world. But what if he had had a recipe to speed up the process?  That recipe is exactly what Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow Li Zhu aims to bring to future engineers, scientists, and inventors! 

Speak Softly and Carry a Knitting Needle: Sharing Stories of Nancy Grace Roman on Campus

Alycia and Nancy Thin

On May 20, 2020, NASA announced that the new Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), which is planned to launch sometime in the mid-2020s, will be named after Nancy Grace Roman. Roman was a pioneer in astronomy and astrophysics, was the first female executive and first Chief of Astronomy at NASA, and is widely known as the “mother” of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. She was also a friend of Carnegie’s Vera Rubin and the Earth and Planets Laboratory astronomy program.

More articles...

Image Gallery

Earth and Planets Laboratory scientists regularly explore our planet and the universe. Along the way they capture images of stunning landscapes, geophysical processes and data visualizations.

Browse our online image gallery to share in the journey of scientific exploration and discovery.

Browse Gallery

Activity

Elsevier

For the first time, Geophysical Laboratory and Department of Terrestrial Magnetism scientists published a paper together as the Earth and Planets Laboratory.

Building the Greenewalt Building

Happy 100th Birthday, Greenewalt Building!

Instagram icon for Carnegie Science

200-ton magnet destined for DTM's cyclotron in June 1940