We explore & discover

Scientists at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) bring the perspective of several disciplines to broad questions about nature. DTM's name comes from its original role to chart the Earth's magnetic field. This goal was largely accomplished by 1929. Since then, DTM has evolved to reflect the growing multi-disciplinary nature of the Earth, planetary, and astronomical sciences. Today, the historic goal remains to understand the physical Earth and the universe that is our home.

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Upcoming Events

Cometary Dust Analysis: From Space Missions to Antarctic Air
Anaïs Bardyn (DTM Weekly Seminar Series)
Thursday, September 28, 2017

The Mystery of Planet Formation
John Chambers (Neighborhood Lecture Series)
Thursday, October 26, 2017

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Latest articles and news

For Second Time in September, Carnegie’s Seismometer Records Devastating Mexican Earthquake

For Second Time in September, Carnegie’s Seismometer Records Devastating Mexican Earthquake

A magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck Raboso, a small town located 65 miles southeast of Mexico City on Tuesday, September 19. The earthquake is substantially closer to the Mexican capital than the magnitude 8.1 earthquake that struck 10 days ago off the coast of Chiapas, Mexico.

National Postdoc Appreciation Week 2017

National Postdoc Appreciation Week 2017

Together with Carnegie's Geophysical Laboratory, the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism is celebrating National Postdoc Appreciation Week 2017.

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Image Gallery

DTM scientists regularly explore our planet and the universe. Along the way they capture images of stunning landscapes, geophysical processes and data visualizations.

Browse DTM’s online image gallery to share in the journey of scientific exploration and discovery.

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Activity

Meredith MacGregor joins DTM as NSF Postdoctoral Fellow to study debris disks as probes of planetary system evolution.

Jaehan Bae joins DTM as Postdoctoral Fellow to work with Alan Boss and study implications for planet formation.

Paul Butler was interviewed by major Brazilian newspaper, O Globo, during his visit to Brazil's National Observatory in Rio de Janeiro.