We explore & discover

Scientists at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) bring the perspective of several disciplines to broad questions about nature. DTM's name comes from its original role to chart the Earth's magnetic field. This goal was largely accomplished by 1929. Since then, DTM has evolved to reflect the growing multi-disciplinary nature of the Earth, planetary, and astronomical sciences. Today, the historic goal remains to understand the physical Earth and the universe that is our home.

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Upcoming Events

“Effects of Subduction Obliquity on Mantle Wedge Flow Patterns and Subduction Zone Processes”
Ikuko Wada (DTM Weekly Seminar Series)
Thursday, March 30, 2017

"Congratulations! You won a grant proposal...now what?"
Jessica Moore (Postdoc Workshop)
Wednesday, April 12, 2017

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Latest articles and news

In Memory of Sandra A. Keiser

Sandy Keiser

Sandra A. Keiser passed away the afternoon of March 17, 2017 at the age of 60. She was hired as a scientific computer programmer, with responsibilities in system management and software development support, on February 1, 1993 by then DTM Director Sean C. Solomon. She came to DTM from General Research Corporation, located in Vienna, VA, with over ten years of experience at both programming and system management.

Matthew Scott Reveals Why We Should Care About Jumping Genes at His Neighborhood Lecture

Matthew Scott

Carnegie Science President Matthew Scott revealed to a sold out Neighborhood Lecture crowd in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall last week how genes that jump from one place in a chromosome to another, or jumping genes, may have influenced early life on Earth and why exactly we should care about them now. The lecture kicked off our Spring 2017 Neighborhood Lecture Series on Thursday, March 16.

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Image Gallery

DTM scientists regularly explore our planet and the universe. Along the way they capture images of stunning landscapes, geophysical processes and data visualizations.

Browse DTM’s online image gallery to share in the journey of scientific exploration and discovery.

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Activity

Erika Nesvold

New work led by Erika Nesvold looks at how a disk is affected by a planet that exists beyond its outermost edge.

Richard Carlson

Rock samples from northeastern Canada retain chemical signals that help explain what Earth’s crust was like more than 4 billion years ago.

Matthew Scott

Matthew Scott reveals why we should care about jumping genes at his Neighborhood Lecture.