Events

"Rocks from Space: Be Grateful and a Little Afraid"

Conel Alexander

April 27, 2017
Neighborhood Lecture Series
Conel Alexander

Our Broad Branch Road Spring 2017 Neighborhood Lecture Series continues with Conel M. O'D. Alexander, a staff scientist at DTM.  Alexander will present, "Rocks from Space: Be Grateful and a Little Afraid" at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 27, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall.

‘Rocks’ from space have had a profound influence on the evolution of Earth – from the giant impact that created the Moon, to the asteroids that killed off the dinosaurs and, more locally, created the Chesapeake Bay, to tiny grains that may have brought prebiotic molecules that helped kick start life on Earth. The rate at which the Earth has accreted material from space has decayed dramatically since it formed. Nevertheless, ignoring the occasional large ‘hiccup’, some 30-40 thousand tons of extraterrestrial material fall to Earth every year as meteorites and cosmic dust. This has been a boon to science, providing samples of other stars and Mars, helping to develop our picture of the timescales and conditions at the birth of our Solar System, and providing constraints for how the terrestrial planets formed. In this talk, Alexander will review where and how meteorites and cosmic dust are collected, and what they have taught us about the origin and early evolution of our Solar System.

Doors open at 6 p.m. Lecture Hall seating is first to come, first serve. Eventbrite tickets are not required, so please arrive early to reserve your seat. Eventbrite registration is encouraged to skip the sign-in process at the door.

Light refreshments will be available before the lecture at 6 p.m.

"The Ancient Lunar Dynamo: How To Resolve the Intensity and Duration Conundrums"

Sabine Stanley

April 27, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Sabine Stanley

Sabine Stanley, a Bloomberg distinguished professor at Johns Hopkins University, will present a lecture titled "The Ancient Lunar Dynamo: How To Resolve the Intensity and Duration Conundrums" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, April 27, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Stanley received her Ph.D. in geophysics from Harvard University in 2004. Her research involves understanding planetary interior processes and evolution. She focuses on planetary magnetic fields, dynamo theory, interior structure models and other geophysical methods to learn about the deep interiors of planets. 

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Recovering a Record of Asteroid Collisions in Marine Sediments"

Phillipp Heck

May 5, 2017
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Philipp Heck

Philipp Heck, the Robert A. Pritzker Associate curator of meteoritics and polar studies at the Field Museum of Natural History, will give a talk titled "Recovering a Record of Asteroid Collisions in Marine Sediments" at 11 a.m on Thursday, May 5, 2017, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Heck received his Ph.D. in geo- and cosmochemistry at ETH Zurich in Switzerland. As the curator in charge and head of the Robert A. Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies, Heck oversees the collection of meteorites, the largest meteorite collection housed at a private research institution. Other responsibilities include the curation of the gem, mineral, rock and economic geology collections.

Coffee, tea, and a light breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

Third Annual GL/DTM Poster Session

Poster Session

May 9, 2017
Annual Poster Session
DTM/GL

The 3rd Annual DTM/GL Poster Session* will take place at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, May 9, 2017, in the Tuve Dining Hall in which anyone on campus is invited to share recent results, crazy ideas, pictures, a video, or a demo of a recent invention. 

The annual poster session, planned this year by DTM postdocs Miki Nakajima and Erika Nesvold and Geophysical Laboratory postdoc Zachary Gaballe, aims to provide Carnegie postdocs, staff scientists, and admin a chance to see what others on campus have been working on. The hosts encourage participants to share ideas about anything related to the on-goings at BBR—data, models, publishing, building engineering, machining, electronics, microscopy, paying taxes, accounting, IT developments, lunch club innovations, etc.

Last year, the session was comprised of 42 original posters. Topics ranged from astronomy to material physics, drawing in more than 60 attendees. A buzz of excitement enveloped the room that afternoon, as participants and attendees mingled together going poster to poster to share their science with each other.

*This event is open to Carnegie personnel only.

Pages