Events

"How To Give A Good Talk: Finding and Keeping a Job"

Matthew Scott

September 21, 2016
Postdoc Appreciation Week Event
Matthew Scott

Matthew Scott, president of the Carnegie Institution for Science, will give a talk titled "How to Give a Good Talk: Finding and Keeping a Job" at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, for our postdoctoral fellows and associates as part of Carnegie's Postdoc Appreciation Week events.

The National Postdoctoral Association holds National Postdoc Appreciation Week each year to recognize the significant contributions that postdoctoral scholars make to U.S. research and discovery.  This year, the celebratory week will be held September 19-23, 2016.

Scott received his Ph.D. in biology from the Massachusettes Institute of Technology in 1980. He moved to Indiana University for his postdoctoral work as a Helen Hay Whitney fellow with Profs. Thomas Kaufman and Barry Polisky. After setting up his own lab at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Dr. Scott came to Stanford in 1990 to join the newly formed Department of Developmental Biology, and the Department of Genetics. His research focused on genes that control development, and how damage to these genes leads to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. He discovered the “homeobox,” an evolutionarily conserved component of many genes that control development. His lab group discovered the genetic basis of the most common human cancer, basal cell carcinoma, and of the most common childhood malignant brain tumor, medulloblastoma. He served as Associate Chair and Chair of the Department of Developmental Biology for a total of six years. He chaired the multidisciplinary Bio-X program at Stanford from 2001-2007. He is presently Co-chair of the Center for Children’s Brain Tumors. He has been recognized by election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine, and served as President of the Society for Developmental Biology. His awards include the Passano Award (1990), the Conklin Medal of the Society for Developmental Biology (2004), and the Pasarow Award in Cancer Research (2013).

This talk is open to Carnegie Science postdocs only.

"Kepler's discovery of worlds with multiple suns"

Nader Haghighipour

September 15, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Nader Haghighipour

Nader Haghighipour, an astronomer at the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii, will give a talk titled "Kepler's discovery of worlds with multiple suns" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, September 15, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Haghighipour received his Ph.D. in physics and planetary dynamics from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1999. His research interests include Solar System dynamics and formation theory, as well as extrasolar planets theory and observation. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"High Contrast Imaging of Planetary Systems from Space"

john debes

September 8, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
John Debes

John Debes, ESA/AURA astronomer at Space Telescope Science Institute, will give a talk titled "High Contrast Imaging of Planetary Systems from Space" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, September 8, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Debes received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Pennsylvania State University in 2005. How plants form and what happens to a planetary system when its central star dies are the two questions that drive the bulk of Debe's research in astronomy. He believes answering these questions will reveal important things about how many habitable planets reside in the Milky way and the ultimate fate of the Solar System.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"A Re-appraisal of Crustal Structure in North America using Probabilistic Seismic Imaging"

Tolulope Olugboji

July 28, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Tolulope Olugboji

Tolulope Olugboji, a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Maryland, College Park, will give a talk titled "A Re-appraisal of Crustal Structure in North America using Probabilistic Seismic Imaging" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 28, 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar series.

Olugboji received his Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from Yale University in 2014. He is an applied computational geoscientist, who synthesizes theoretical, observational (e.g., seismology and Bayesian computational methods) and experimental evidence (e.g. mineral physics and geochemistry). Olugboji seeks to improve our understanding of the chemical composition and physical behavior of the solid earth.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

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