Events

"Dark Matter & MOND: Up the Proverbial Creek"

Stacy McGagugh

May 12, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Stacy McGaugh

Stacy McGaugh, a professor in the the department of astronomy at Case Western Reserve University, will give a talk titled "Dark Matter & MOND: Up the Proverbial Creek" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 12 May 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

McGaugh received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Michigan in 1992. His research interests include galaxy formation and evolution, low surface brightness galaxies, the mass discrepancy problem, and cosmology. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"From Astronomy to Policy - A Not Entirely Unexpected Journey"

Reba Bandyopadhyay

May 10, 2016
Postdoctoral Development Workshop
Reba Bandyopadhyay

Reba Bandyopadhyay, a AAAS science and technology policy fellow at the National Science Foundation (NSF), will lead a workshop titled "From Astronomy to Policy - A Not Entirely Unexpected Journey" at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, 10 May 2016, in the Abelson Building Collaboration Center as part of DTM's Postdoctoral Development Workshop Series.

Bandyopadhyay received her Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Oxford in 1998. She's an astronomer whose primary research interest is infrared and X-ray observations of X-ray binary stars - systems containing a black hole or a neutron star - in our Galaxy. 

Coffee, tea, and snacks will be served before the workshop at 10:30 a.m.

"Terrestrial core formation and the origin of the Moon"

Alex Halliday

May 4, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Alex Halliday

Alex Halliday, a professor of geochemistry at Oxford University, will give a talk titled "Terrestrial core formation and the origin of the Moon" at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, 4 May 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series.

Halliday received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Newcastle in 1977. He uses isotope geochemistry to understand the origins of planets and the present day natural behaviour of the Earth by utilising mass spectrometry to measure small natural variations in atomic abundance. 

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

"Presolar Stardust in the Solar System"

Larry Nittler

April 28, 2016
DTM Weekly Seminar Series
Larry Nittler

Larry Nittler, staff scientist at DTM, will give a talk titled "Presolar Stardust in the Solar System" at 11 a.m. on Thursday, 28 March 2016, in the Greenewalt Lecture Hall as part of DTM's Weekly Seminar Series. 

Nittler received his Ph.D. in physics from Washington University in 1996. He studies the origin and evolution of stars, the Galaxy, and the Solar System, both through laboratory analysis of extraterrestrial materials like meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and through planetary remote sensing via spacecraft.

Coffee, tea, and a continental breakfast will be served before the lecture at 10:30 a.m.

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