postdoc spotlight

Postdoc Spotlight: Zack Torrano Solves Cosmic Mysteries Using Solar System’s Oldest Solids

Zack Torrano Banner Image

In this postdoc spotlight, Zack Torrano explains how his recent research showed that the oldest solids in our Solar System preserved Ti isotopic variability inherited from the materials from which our Solar System formed. He also discusses how his early love of nature inspired him to want to explore and understand our world and its place in the Universe.

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Postdoc Spotlight: Irina Chuvashova Finds New Ways to Measure Materials Under Pressure

Irina Chuvashova in the Lab with COVID19 Mask - Coronavirus Materials Science

In this Postdoc Spotlight interview, materials scientist Irina Chuvashova discusses her recent work and explores what inspired her to become a materials scientist. She also lays out what comes after she finishes her postdoc in September.  

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Postdoc Spotlight: Peng Ni - Geochemical Detective

Peng Ni holds a piece of iron meteorite. Thin for news tile

In this Postdoc Spotlight, Ni discusses how he got interested in experimental geochemistry, his most recent publication, and his love of photography.

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Postdoc Spotlight: Modelling Mid-Ocean Ridges with Joyce Sim

Joyce Sim in Kamchatka

Joyce Sim recently published two papers that looked at mantle melting, magma, and crust creation at mid-ocean ridges. In this month’s Postdoc Spotlight, we sat down with Sim over Zoom to discuss these two papers, what it means to be a scientist, and her hopes for the future of geodynamics. 

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Postdoc Spotlight: Looking at Planetary System Evolution with Meredith MacGregor

Postdoc Spotlight: Looking at Planetary System Evolution with Meredith MacGregor

Postdoc Meredith MacGregor takes us through her journey from kindergarten science fairs to stars trillions of miles away.

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Postdoc Spotlight: Cosmochemist Nan Liu

Nan Liu

After receiving an offer from the University of Chicago to study cosmochemistry, DTM postdoctoral fellow Nan Liu packed up and moved to the States. While at Chicago, Liu discovered her passion for studying presolar grains, or interstellar dust grains derived from dying stars dating back to before the formation of our Solar System. To her, the coolest thing she could imagine doing for a career was to hold tiny, interstellar fragments of dying stars in her hands every day. We talked to Liu about what she likes most about her field of research, and where she sees her career going in the future following her postdoc at DTM.

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