Kei Shimizu
DCO Postdoctoral Associate

Kei Shimizu

Research Interests

Mantle and crustal geochemistry; mineral-melt trace element partitioning; geochemical modeling; development of REE geothermobarometer

Academics

B.S., Geology, Stony Brook University, 2010
Ph.D., Geological Sciences, Brown University, 2016

Contact & Links

  • (202)478-8464 | fax: (202) 478-8821
  • kshimizu at carnegiescience.edu
  • Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
    Carnegie Institution of Washington
    5241 Broad Branch Road, NW
    Washington, DC 20015-1305
  • curriculum vitae
  • Publications

Overview

Kei Shimizu
Reflected-light photomicrograph of an olivine-hosted melt inclusion from a mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). Geochemical analyses of MORB melt inclusions and glasses are used to better constrain processes undergone by the magmas (degree of mantle melting, melt mixing, fractional crystallization, and volatile degassing) and the composition of the Earth’s upper mantle.

Kei Shimizu is interested in the evolution of the Earth’s mantle and crust through the history of the Earth. He currently investigates this using geochemical analysis of magmas generated by melting of the Earth’s upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges (mid-ocean ridge basalts or MORBs) to better constrain the processes that the magmas have undergone (degree of mantle melting, melt mixing, fractional crystallization, and volatile degassing) and the composition of the Earth's upper mantle. Part of his Ph.D. dissertation research focused on understanding the chemical variation in MORBs generated at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) through new geochemical analysis and modeling and its implications for the volatile content (C, H, F, Cl, S) of the Pacific upper mantle.

Shimizu also investigates mineral-melt trace element partitioning by using experimental partitioning data to developing models of trace element partitioning between minerals and melts. Using the model and natural data, he looks for chemical signatures of melting/fractional crystallization of minerals in magmas. Part of his Ph.D. dissertation research focused on development of rare earth element (REE) partitioning models between amphibole and silicate melt to better understand arc magma differentiation and its implications for the composition of the continental crust.

At DTM, Shimizu will work on (1) D/H analyses of MORBs from the EPR to better understand the processes that causes the variation in the volatile abundances in Pacific MORBs, and (2) developing HFSE partitioning models between amphibole and silicate melt to better understand the role of amphibole in producing trace element pattern of arc magmas.